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Honeymood: BFI London Film Festival Movie Review

Honeymood: BFI London Film Festival Movie Review

Writer: Talya Lavie
Director: Talya Lavie
Producers: Eitan Mansuri, Jonathan Doweck, Marica Stocchi
Starring: Ran Danker, Avigail Harari

Check out more of our BFI London Film Festival Coverage here.


Honeymood

Honeymood” marked my first film of the BFI London Film Festival 202 for me. In fact, it marked the first film from my first film festival. For this, I count myself exceptionally lucky.

Noam and Eleanor are newlyweds, and it is alongside them that we navigate their wedding night – not alone, however. Honeymood is a film made of soft moments and small touches that we save for our lovers. That being said, it is also a firm voice of reason, forcing us to take a long hard look at ourselves, our lives, and our choices.

Writer/director Talya Lavie takes us through the ups and downs of relationships in just one night. Sometimes, that’s all it takes. The usual players of doubt all take their spots; exes, overbearing family, new acquaintances – each ready to throw a spanner in the works for our honeymooners. Distractions aside, the pair don’t do themselves any favours, either.

That’s the thing about Honeymood – it feels odd, unusually personal throughout, even though it has no reason to. You feel at once like Noam, Eleanor, their exes, and the friends with whom they are sharing their side of this story over coffee. You bounce your empathy and frustration from one person to another and you laugh, too. Then, you sit there with a wan smile knowing that you can’t really take a side because you’ve been there, and you’ve done that.


Just Like Honeymood

There are some standout shots in Honeymood, as intimate as the glimpses we sneak of Eleanor and Noam’s relationship. A dress caught in a taxi door touched me more than I thought it ever could. Lighting, too, takes our hand and leads us through the night with the couple. It’s a very specific feeling, that light in the early hours of the morning as the night melts away, and Lavie has you feel every ray.

An unexpected interlude still somehow doesn’t take you out of the Hoeymood; after all, anything can happen in the city at night, why not that, too? The magic isn’t lost, and these little moments, apropos of nothing, provide breathers in amongst al the real life.

Into the Night

Ran Danker and Avigail Harari provide soft, deliberate performances which make Honeymood all the more compelling. The two bring an uncertainty to the characters, and they carry that uncertainty with such poise they almost convince you…and themselves. Pair the two with the rest of the cast, the gentle score, and beautiful editing and you have something special.

Honeymood is a rom-com for cynics, for world-worn grown ups, and for those a bit jaded but holding onto that las sliver of hope – however slight it may be. Summed up perfectly in the final scenes of the film, Honeymood is one that I will absolutely come back to time and again.


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